FriesenPress

© 2021 FriesenPress, Inc. All rights reserved.



Not Your Dad's Stroke cover


1. eBook Edition
978-1-03-911912-3
  • EPUB format
  • PDF format
2. Paperback Edition
978-1-03-911910-9
  • Black & White
  • 128 pages
  • 8.5 x 8.5 inches
3. Hardcover Edition
978-1-03-911911-6
  • Black & White
  • 128 pages
  • 8.5 x 8.5 inches
Categories:
Keywords:

stroke recovery, surviving a stroke, stroke resources, peer stroke support, stroke advances, stroke treatment, support stroke patients

Not Your Dad's Stroke
by Ron LaCombe




Not Your Dad’s Stroke is written by a stroke survivor for stroke survivors and their loved ones. It documents the author’s recovery from a 2012 stroke, and examines the research and treatment advancements over the twenty years since his dad had his stroke. The author also discusses strategies and resources to help make recovery easier. The book includes personal accounts from other stroke survivors, caregivers, and a therapist. Not all the stories have happy endings, but all are informative and inspirational.

Most newly diagnosed stroke patients are in fear of the unknown. In the author’s case, his first thought was of his dad's stroke, and how it had been the start of his dad’s decline. However, as the author’s treatment and recovery began, the first thing he realized was that things had changed for the better, with faster diagnoses and improved treatments. From the beginning, he had a better prognosis, with early discussions on recovery and preventing the next stroke. Everyone knows someone that has had a stroke. It can happen to anyone at any age. No two strokes are the same, as no two recoveries are the same. The bottom line is that recovery is hard work, survivors have to keep at it, and at some point, learn to accept the new version of themselves.

This book will be an informative resource and inspiration for newly diagnosed stroke patients, anyone who has suffered a stroke, and for the loved ones and caregivers of stroke survivors. The manuscript was built around common questions about stroke identified though conversations with stroke survivors, caregivers, and peer support workers.

www.notyourdadsstroke.ca


Ron LaCombe is an award-winning writer, winning first place for his essay in the 2020 Royal Canadian Legion Seniors Writing Competition. He also knows a thing or two about strokes; he is a nine-year stroke survivor of approximately twenty mini strokes. During his recovery, Ron kept himself busy, signing up for stroke research projects, becoming involved with the Toronto Stroke Network’s patient and family advisory committee as a co-chair, and sitting on the Toronto Stroke Network’s steering committee. The idea for the book came about during discussion with fellow committee members. Now, as part of the March of Dimes Canada Peers Fostering Hope program, Ron visits newly diagnosed stroke patients, while they are still in the stroke unit, to answer their questions and let them know there is hope. He makes an effort to stay up to date on new research developments and therapeutic approaches by reading as much as he can. Ron maintains a blog to share his experience and knowledge, and offer support for patients and families: www.strokerecoverysupport.com.

Ron understands first hand that the stroke patient has survived possibly the worst day of their life. With this book, he hopes to provide hope and inspiration, and inform readers that with ongoing research by dedicated medical professionals, and a lot of hard work by the stroke survivor, positive outcomes are possible.

Ron lives in Toronto, Ontario, with his wife, Debbie.


Contributors

Author
Ron LaCombe

What People are Saying


eBook $4.99 eBook $6.99 Paperback $13.99 Paperback $17.99 Hardcover $23.99 Hardcover $30.99
FriesenPress Editions

Support our self-published authors and buy directly from FriesenPress. All Prices shown are in US Canadian Dollars.

Other eBook Editions

This book is also available in eBook format from these sites.


Learn how you can self-publish your own book with FriesenPress.

Download Publishing Guide